3 reasons workplace race discrimination goes unreported

On Behalf of | Apr 9, 2021 | workplace discrimination |

You have a right to go to work without facing discrimination because of your race. Unfortunately, though, racial discrimination in the workplace remains a significant problem in Pennsylvania and across the U.S. In fact, as many as 25% of black workers nationwide report experiencing discrimination at work.

Race discrimination involves treating employees or applicants differently because of their race. While some workers complain when their employers act illegally, many others choose to remain silent. Here are three common reasons race discrimination in the workplace often goes unreported.

1. Fear of retaliation

Even though workers have a right to complain about illegal race discrimination, they may not do so out of fear of retaliation. Specifically, employees may believe filing a complaint will lead to termination of their employment, denial of promotions or other negative consequences. Still, retaliating against employees who exercise their legal rights or engage in protected activities is usually against the law.

2. Concern about career

Few employees want to have the reputation for being difficult. While filing a discrimination complaint is within any worker’s rights, an individual may worry about his or her career prospects. That is, a victim of race discrimination at work may fear he or she may never land another job after lodging a discrimination complaint.

3. Uncertainty about resolution

Some individuals who experience race discrimination at work simply believe the system does not function correctly. These employees may think filing a discrimination complaint or charge is not likely to bring about an acceptable resolution.

Fortunately, officials regularly investigate racial discrimination in the workplace and hold employers accountable for illegal activities. While many incidents of race discrimination may go unreported, filing a complaint may be one of the more effective ways to protect an employee’s career and legal rights.