Housekeepers may be at increased risk of sexual harassment

On Behalf of | Feb 14, 2022 | sexual harassment |

If you work as a housekeeper for a major hotel, you are probably experiencing a boost to your career. After all, as staffing shortages continue to grip the hospitality sector, you may be in a good position to negotiate a pay raise or better working conditions. Still, if you have to deal with sexual harassment, more money and better conditions likely mean little to you.

According to reporting from NPR, 25% of sexual harassment claims come from service-sector employees. Therefore, as a housekeeper, you may have an increased risk of becoming the victim of sexual harassment.

The unique nature of your job

The guests with whom you interact may treat your workplace as their own homes. Regrettably, because they spend the night in rooms in the hotel, visitors may feel freer to act inappropriately. Even worse, guests may be able to lock their doors and isolate you from your coworkers and other guests who may be able to intervene.

A similar problem to other workers

In addition to guests at the hotel, your coworkers may also behave inappropriately. Just as many other employees must deal with sexual harassment from their colleagues, your manager or coworkers may sexually harass you. Still, because of the nature of your workplace, your colleagues may have a readily accessible place to turn sexual harassment into sexual assault.

Your employer’s legal obligations

Your employer has a legal obligation to take reasonable steps to prevent sexual harassment. This is true regardless of whether the harassers are guests, coworkers or anyone else. If you report sexual harassment, you should be able to expect your employer to investigate and take other appropriate steps.

Ultimately, if your employer refuses to assist you, you may have grounds to file a legal claim against the hotel where you work.